Global experts give green signal to Alang

Archiv: Top experts of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) and other global agencies, who visited India’s ship recycling hub Alang, have expressed satisfaction at the safety and environment conditions at the world’s largest shipbreaking yard.

India | Top experts of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) and other global agencies, who visited India’s ship recycling hub Alang, have expressed satisfaction at the safety and environment conditions at the world’s largest shipbreaking yard.
The team was also impressed by the ship recyclers’ readiness to implement the Supreme Court guidelines on the twin controversial issues that have pushed Alang under a cloud and dampened the spirits of the owners of the 173 ship-cutting blocks.
An official of the Gujarat Maritime Board, which has been striving to turn Alang into an environment-friendly told newspaper Khaleej Times that the trip on the eve of the International Maritime Conference in Mumbai ended on a positive note with delegates finding labour and environment conditions at the yard ’satisfactory’.
Besides the IMO ‒ a specialised United Nations agency responsible for improving maritime safety and preventing pollution through ships ‒ other organisations, which had sent their experts were the International Labour Organisation, the World Bank, the Eurpoean Maritime Safety Agency and the Basel Convention.
Sources say the shipbreakers heaved a sigh of relief with the high-powered team approving of Alang’s asbestos dumping site, the landfill site and training facilities for labourers.
The ship-dismantling yard in the Gulf of Cambay fell on bad days after Greenpeace raised a storm over its alleged poor facilities to handle the supposedly toxic material carried by Alang-bound decommissioned French aircraft carrier Le Clemenceau and Norwegian passenger vessel Blue Lady.
While the number of obsolete ships coming to Alang on their last journey, has sunk from 295 in 2001 to just 95 now, as many as 60 ship cyclers have shut shop after their businesses went to rack and ruin, thanks to stiff competition from Pakistan and Bangladesh, harassment by state and federal agencies and campaigns by the green brigade.



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